ANDREW PIERCE at the Conservative Party conference3 min read

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Hundreds of signed copies of David Cameron’s autobiography For The Record are on sale at conference — at a discounted price.

I’m told the ex-PM considered attending but stayed away to avoid being asked difficult questions about Brexit.

The book was three years in the making — so it is strange that despite its 750 pages, its author did not find the space to mention one significant figure during his leadership.

Lord Ashcroft, whom Cameron made deputy Tory chairman and who helped raise millions of pounds for the party, is curiously absent from the oeuvre. 

Hundreds of signed copies of David Cameron’s autobiography For The Record are on sale at conference — at a discounted price, writes ANDREW PIERCE

Hundreds of signed copies of David Cameron’s autobiography For The Record are on sale at conference — at a discounted price, writes ANDREW PIERCE

Cameron has never forgiven Ashcroft for the latter’s unauthorised 2015 biography, Call Me Dave, which included the allegation that, while an undergraduate at Oxford, the future PM took part in a bizarre initiation ceremony that included a pig’s head.

In his book, Cameron says: ‘My first reaction wasn’t anger or embarrassment. I couldn’t believe someone would write a book about me and include a story that was both false and ludicrous.’

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But not everyone was immediately sure it was false. Cameron’s mother Mary telephoned her son the day after the pig’s head story went public to ask him if it was true.

A friend of Cameron said: ‘I think it was the only time Mrs Cameron, who had heard all sorts of stories about Dave, actually went to the trouble to call him to seek reassurance it was ridiculous.’

Major’s big curtain call 

Chatter abounds in hotel bars of the antics of Sir John Major, who joined the legal case against Boris at the Supreme Court, then accused him of chicanery in a speech.

Yes, this is the same Major who declared on the steps of Downing Street in 1997 (after his trouncing by Tony Blair): ‘When the curtain falls, it is time to get off the stage — and that is what I propose to do.’

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Yet another politician who breaks his word. 

Chatter abounds in hotel bars of the antics of Sir John Major (picturted on March 11) , who joined the legal case against Boris at the Supreme Court, then accused him of chicanery in a speech, writes ANDREW PIERCE

Chatter abounds in hotel bars of the antics of Sir John Major (picturted on March 11) , who joined the legal case against Boris at the Supreme Court, then accused him of chicanery in a speech, writes ANDREW PIERCE

Amid the barrage of criticism, at least one person is happy to defend Boris’s combative Parliamentary language last week.

The Tory Party’s official historian, Lord Lexden, told the ConservativeHome website: ‘MPs have been almost shamefully well-behaved during the Brexit debates. 

Churchill in his Liberal days wore with pride the scar inflicted on his forehead by the bound copy of Commons Standing Orders hurled at him by an enraged Tory in 1912.

‘Where are the free fights and suspended sittings of yore? The verbal pugnacity of Speaker Bercow is a poor substitute for the ancient traditions of the House.’ That’s fighting talk.

Quote of the day  

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Commons Leader, said: ‘Like Gulliver tied down at Lilliput, we are tied down by a ragtag, motley collection of feeble, fickle, footling politicians.

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‘All in desperate pursuit of a single ignoble aim — to renege on the solemn promise they made to the British people and try to cancel the largest single democratic mandate in our history.’

Had he been enjoying our own Stephen Glover, who asked in Thursday’s Mail: ‘Can [Boris], like Jonathan Swift’s fictional hero Gulliver … break free from the bonds wrapped around him by lesser men?’

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured yesterday), the Commons Leader, said: ‘Like Gulliver tied down at Lilliput, we are tied down by a ragtag, motley collection of feeble, fickle, footling politicians .'

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured yesterday), the Commons Leader, said: ‘Like Gulliver tied down at Lilliput, we are tied down by a ragtag, motley collection of feeble, fickle, footling politicians .’

Don’t they know it’s Brexit?  

Tory MEPs over in Brussels are looking for an intern to begin work with them at the European Parliament on a stipend of £1,500 a month. 

Perhaps they know something we don’t. The job starts on November 1 — the day after Britain is supposed to have left the EU.