Asian man dips a baby mouse in a bowl of sauce before eating it ALIVE6 min read

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An Asian man has been filmed dipping a live baby mouse into a bowl of sauce before eating it.

The disgusting footage showed the man picking up a baby mouse with chopsticks before calmly devouring the squeaking rodent that was still moving.

The revolting meal, which was accompanied by a plate of tomatoes, is reportedly considered a delicacy in the Guangdong province of southeast China.

The government banned the dish, but it can still be found in backstreet restaurants.  

The disgusting footage showed the man picking up a baby mouse with chopsticks before calmly devouring the squeaking rodent that was still moving

The revolting meal, which was accompanied by a plate of tomatoes, is a delicacy in the Guangdong province of southeast China

An Asian man has been filmed dipping a live baby mouse into a bowl of sauce before eating it

The practice has been given the gruesome name of ‘Three Squeaks’ because the mouse squeaks when it gets picked up by a diner, again when it gets dipped into the sauce and finally as it dies.

It’s unclear where the footage takes place, although the man in the video can be heard using the Chinese phrase for ‘mouse’.  

It comes after footage purporting to show a Chinese woman eating a whole bat at a fancy restaurant went viral. 

A separate trending video appeared to show Cantonese-speaking diners preparing to eat soup made with the nocturnal animal. 

The new strain of coronavirus, which emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan last month, has killed at least 41 people, affected more than 1,000 and caused the city of 11 million to be put in lockdown. 

The virus, which can cause pneumonia, is poorly understood. Scientists now fear it may have spread to humans from snakes or bats.  

A leading Chinese virologist who helped tackle the SARS epidemic in Asia in 2003 has warned that a new strain of deadly coronavirus from China could lead to an outbreak at least 10 times worse than the health crisis 17 years ago.

Bats are used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a series of illnesses, including coughing, malaria and gonorrhea. 

Pictures emerging on Twitter shows soup cooked with a bat

Bats are used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a series of illness, including coughing, Malaria and Gonorrhea

Pictures emerging on Twitter shows soup cooked with a bat. Bats are used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a series of illness, including coughing, Malaria and Gonorrhea

The animal’s faeces is also believed to be able to cure eye diseases, according to ancient Chinese medical masterpiece Ben Cao Gang Mu. 

The first trending video, said to be trending on Weibo and shared by Hong Kong-based Apple Daily, shows a young woman holding a bat with chopsticks as she nibbled on one of the mammal’s wings.

One man can be heard telling the woman in Mandarin: ‘Eat the meat! [Don’t] eat the skin.’

He added: ‘[You] should eat the meat on its back.’

The bat was thought to be from a large pot of soup placed in the middle of the table.

The second viral video, posted by influential Chinese blogger Chen Qiushi on Twitter, shows a cooked, grinning bat placed in a large bowl of broth.

‘[After] experiencing this matter, can Chinese people give up eating wildlife?’ the blogger asked in a post. 

Both videos remain unverified.   

In November 2015 a shocking video of newborn mice being prepared to be eaten emerged online.  

The footage is believed to have been shot at a restaurant in Guangdong, south China, where mice are a specialty.  

The video showed the mice next to a pot of broth being dipped into a plate of sauce.

A separate footage of a man actually eating the mice was also posted online.

The man was seen with a plate of the baby rodents in front of him.

After smothering the still-wriggling creatures in a brown sauce, he put one in his mouth and chewed on the mouse. 

THE KILLER VIRUS MAY HAVE COME FROM BATS, SCIENTISTS SAY 

The killer coronavirus sweeping across the world may have come from bats, scientists have said.

Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the People’s Liberation Army and Institut Pasteur of Shanghai came to the conclusion.

In a statement, the team said: ‘The Wuhan coronavirus’ natural host could be bats… but between bats and humans there may be an unknown intermediate.

Tests of the virus, which has yet to be named, have revealed it targets a protein called ACE2 – just like its cousin SARS, the South China Morning Post reported.

Tracing the evolution of the virus, the team of experts found it belonged to betacoronavirus, making it structurally similar to SARS.

Authorities have pointed the blame on food markets in Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak that scientists are scrambling to contain.

Rodents and bats among other animals are slaughtered and sold in traditional ‘wet markets’, which tourists flock to see the ‘real’ side of the country.

Italian Health Ministry officials get ready to screen passengers at Rome's Fiumicino Airport for the virus

Italian Health Ministry officials get ready to screen passengers at Rome’s Fiumicino Airport for the virus

Coronavirus: What we know so far 

What is the coronavirus?

The virus has been identified as a new type of coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of pathogens, most of which cause mild respiratory infections such as the common cold.

But coronaviruses can also be deadly. SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, is caused by a coronavirus and killed hundreds of people in China and Hong Kong in the early 2000s.

Can it kill?

Yes. Seventeen people have so far died after testing positive for the virus. Most patients die from complications including pneumonia and swelling in lungs. Severe pneumonia can kill people by causing them to drown in the ‘fluid’ flooding their lungs. The virus also causes swelling in the respiratory system, which can make it hard for the lungs to pass oxygen into the bloodstream – leading to organ failure and death.

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What are the symptoms?

Its symptoms are typically a fever, cough and trouble breathing, but some patients have developed pneumonia, a potentially life-threatening infection that causes inflammation of the small air sacs in the lungs. People carrying the novel coronavirus may only have mild symptoms, such as a sore throat. They may assume they have a common cold and not seek medical attention, experts fear.

How is it detected?

The virus’s genetic sequencing was released by scientists in China to the rest of the world to enable other countries to quickly diagnose potential new cases. This helps other countries respond quickly to disease outbreaks.

To contain the virus, airports are detecting infected people with temperature checks. But as with every virus, it has an incubation period, meaning detection is not always possible because symptoms have not appeared yet.

How did it start and spread?

Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people, the World Health Organisation (WHO) says.

The first cases identified were among people connected to the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan.

Cases have since been identified elsewhere which could have been spread through human-to-human transmission.

What are countries doing to prevent the spread?

Countries in Asia have stepped up airport surveillance. They include Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines.

Australia and the US are also screening patients for a high temperature, and the UK announced it will screen passengers returning from Wuhan.

Is it similar to anything we’ve ever seen before?

Experts have compared it to the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The epidemic started in southern China and killed more than 700 people in mainland China, Hong Kong and elsewhere