Brexit, camp closures and onset of winter are why record numbers of migrants are crossing Channel7 min read

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Greedy people smugglers are exploiting the ‘perfect storm’ of Brexit, refugee camps closing and the threat of a freezing winter to charge migrants up to £6,000 to cross the English Channel, MailOnline can reveal.

Traffickers are hiking up prices and telling families they must leave France for the UK now because further delays will make the journey impossible.

While prices to cross the Channel are usually £3,000 to £4,000 per person, that figure has risen as record numbers of migrants are flocking to the UK to beat the Brexit deadline.

Typical is the Rusol family who say they have given over their life savings to make the journey from the refugee camp in Dunkirk in a failed bid to get across.  

Kader Rusol, from Iraq, is determined to bring his wife Aisha, twin sons Alan and Aland, both 12, son Aria, seven and five-month old son to the UK. 

The Rusol family from Iraq including father Kader, his wife Aisha, their twin sons Alan and Aland, both 12, son Aria, seven and five-month old son (above) have had their life savings taken from them by people smugglers as they try to reach the UK before Brexit

The Rusol family from Iraq including father Kader, his wife Aisha, their twin sons Alan and Aland, both 12, son Aria, seven and five-month old son (above) have had their life savings taken from them by people smugglers as they try to reach the UK before Brexit

A ‘perfect-storm’ of fears over Brexit, the closure of refugee camps and the onset of winter has led to record numbers of migrants risking their lives to cross the England Channel in small boats, a French official has said. Pictured: Boys re-enact a boat trip using crates

A ‘perfect-storm’ of fears over Brexit, the closure of refugee camps and the onset of winter has led to record numbers of migrants risking their lives to cross the England Channel in small boats, a French official has said. Pictured: Boys re-enact a boat trip using crates

Abdel Diabi, from the French coastal town of Grande-Synthe (migrant camp pictured above), five miles from Dunkirk, said the toxic combination had prompted the sudden rise

Abdel Diabi, from the French coastal town of Grande-Synthe (migrant camp pictured above), five miles from Dunkirk, said the toxic combination had prompted the sudden rise

More than 120 people have either landed on British beaches or been intercepted in British waters in the past two days after embarking on the treacherous journey across the world’s busiest shipping lane

More than 120 people have either landed on British beaches or been intercepted in British waters in the past two days after embarking on the treacherous journey across the world’s busiest shipping lane

He told MailOnline: ‘We need to get to Britain as quickly as possible, we know the weather will soon get a lot colder.

‘And with nowhere to live when [Grande-Synth] closes, we are more determined than ever.’  

Mr Rusol, 41, said he had spent all his money for the passage on a small inflatable boat to England, only to get lost at sea and be taken back to France.

The shopkeeper said: ‘My baby son fell into the water from a boat and almost drowned. We were frightened, the children were crying, my wife was shouting. But no matter how many times we will keep trying to get Britain.

‘We cannot stay here in France. We are treated like animals. We have no other chance for our children.’ 

Another family who didn’t want to be identified told MailOnline that they were told the cost of getting across the Channel was £6,000 each. 

The cost and sophistication of efforts to smuggle migrants into Britain from France has varied considerably.

Prices have in the past ranged from as little as just over £100 for a single, basic attempt – but the costs have soared considerably as panic-stricken migrants are now willing to pay as much as £6,000 for a journey including ‘high-quality concealment’.  

Claire Moseley, from the charity Care4Calais, said the migrants were increasingly desperate to risk their lives.

‘I’m sure that the closure of the refugee centre at Grande-Synthe and the oncoming winter is concentrating people’s minds about trying to get to England. 

‘I’m not sure that Brexit is a factor but I an aware what the Calais MP has said. The problem is that people are now wandering around Calais with nowhere to go. 

‘For them, the UK is the answer, so if you take them away on buses or trains they are just going to come back.’ 

He told MailOnline: 'We need to get to Britain as quickly as possible, we know the weather will soon get a lot colder. 'And with nowhere to live when [Grande-Synth] (above) closes, we are more determined than ever'

He told MailOnline: ‘We need to get to Britain as quickly as possible, we know the weather will soon get a lot colder. ‘And with nowhere to live when [Grande-Synth] (above) closes, we are more determined than ever’

Hundreds of other migrants are living in woods and abandoned houses in Calais and other small towns along the France’s north coast

Hundreds of other migrants are living in woods and abandoned houses in Calais and other small towns along the France’s north coast

A senior town hall worker in France said this perfect storm of conditions has led to record numbers of migrants crossing the Channel over the past few weeks.

Abdel Diabi, based in the coastal town of Grande-Synthe, five miles from Dunkirk, said the toxic combination had prompted the sudden rise.

More than 120 people have either landed on British beaches or been intercepted in British waters in the past two days after embarking on the treacherous journey across the world’s busiest shipping lane.

The main camp at Grande-Synth – which houses 1,000 people – is due to close imminently after town hall officials obtained an eviction order, while on Thursday around 200 people were cleared out of a camp in Calais.

‘The migrants all want to reach England, it is their only dream,’ Mr Diabi told MailOnline.

‘But they fear that the Brexit will change the situation with the borders and with working rights in England for immigrants. 

‘They have all heard that the migrants centre here will close soon and they are worried that they will be sent a long way away. 

‘And they know that the weather conditions are getting worse – not only on the sea but also living here outside.’ 

Faridoun Salh told how he and his family were rescued from the English Channel by the British authorities. But he revealed how he was then deported to Italy along with his brother Farhat, his sister-in-law Langa and their three-year-old daughter Tina (above) but are going back to UK

Faridoun Salh told how he and his family were rescued from the English Channel by the British authorities. But he revealed how he was then deported to Italy along with his brother Farhat, his sister-in-law Langa and their three-year-old daughter Tina (above) but are going back to UK

Claire Moseley from the charity Care4Calais said the migrants were increasingly desperate to risk their lives. ‘I’m sure that the closure of the refugee centre at Grande-Synthe and the oncoming winter is concentrating people's minds about trying to get to England'

Claire Moseley from the charity Care4Calais said the migrants were increasingly desperate to risk their lives. ‘I’m sure that the closure of the refugee centre at Grande-Synthe and the oncoming winter is concentrating people’s minds about trying to get to England’

The growing number of migrants reaching Britain in small boats – estimated at 1,000 so far this year – represents a huge spike, compared to only a handful of sea crossings in previous years. 

Hundreds of people have been rescued from the sea in small boats and returned to France in the last month and two migrants – one man and one woman – drowned.

Pierre-Henri Dumont, the Conservative MP for Calais, said smugglers were exploiting anxiety over Brexit to cash in.

‘Smugglers say to migrants, ‘If the UK leaves the EU, you will not ever be able to cross the Channel’.

‘It’s a lie, because it won’t change anything. Smugglers are giving fake news to migrants, but it’s for them to earn money.’

Hundreds of other migrants are living in woods and abandoned houses in Calais and other small towns along the France’s north coast.  

Faridoun Salh told how he and his family were rescued from the English Channel in the middle of the night by the British authorities.

But he revealed how he was then deported to Italy along with his brother Farhat, his sister-in-law Langa and their three-year-old daughter Tina.

Now they have made their way back to the coast and are determined to get back to Britain.

Faridoun told MailOnline: ‘We did not ask for asylum in Italy. There is nothing for us there. So we are back here in France.

‘We won’t stop trying until we get to Britain and we know we must get there as soon as we can.’