Care worker, 31, has newborn son to pass £50m stately home to7 min read

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It is the life he always knew he was born to – but only now after a DNA test has he been able to settle in as the new lord of the manor.

Jordan Adlard Rogers, 31, has moved his partner, Katie Hubber, 30, and son Joshua, who was born last month, into the £50million 1,536-acre Penrose Estate in Cornwall.

It comes after the former care worker proved he is the illegitimate son of the previous owner Charles Rogers, who died last year from a drug overdose.

The father-of-one has certainly got his feet under the table since taking over the reins, installing a home gym just feet away from the historic mansion building.

He described 2019 as the start of ‘massive new beginnings’ and shared images of a new Mercedes C63 outside the property, adding: ‘Seeing if the Merc suits the house.’

He has posted images that show him ‘patrolling the lake’ on the estate in a kayak and in another post, he says he wants to ‘fish my lake’.

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Jordan Adlard Rogers has moved his partner, Katie Hubber (pictured together) and son Joshua, who was born last month, into the £50million 1,536-acre Penrose Estate in Cornwall

Jordan Adlard Rogers has moved his partner, Katie Hubber (pictured together) and son Joshua, who was born last month, into the £50million 1,536-acre Penrose Estate in Cornwall 

Jordan described 2019 as the start of 'massive new beginnings' and shared images of a new Mercedes C63 outside his property, adding: 'Seeing if the Merc suits the house'

Jordan described 2019 as the start of ‘massive new beginnings’ and shared images of a new Mercedes C63 outside his property, adding: ‘Seeing if the Merc suits the house’

In images posted on Instagram, Jordan shows off the outdoor gym he has built in the grounds of his estate, yards away from the historic mansion

In images posted on Instagram, Jordan shows off the outdoor gym he has built in the grounds of his estate, yards away from the historic mansion

Mr Rogers is pictured in a Facebook post in January with a cigar, a glass of wine and a pint, as he celebrates his newfound wealth

Mr Rogers is pictured in a Facebook post in January with a cigar, a glass of wine and a pint, as he celebrates his newfound wealth

The first known owner of the historic estate (pictured today) was John de Penrose, in 1281. It remained in the Penrose family until it was bought in the 1770s by Hugh Rogers for £11,000

The first known owner of the historic estate (pictured today) was John de Penrose, in 1281. It remained in the Penrose family until it was bought in the 1770s by Hugh Rogers for £11,000

The family seem to be enjoying the high life following the sudden windfall, with Jordan and partner Katie enjoying a celebratory trip to New York in December (pictured)

The family seem to be enjoying the high life following the sudden windfall, with Jordan and partner Katie enjoying a celebratory trip to New York in December (pictured)

However, he may not be aware that it was stipulated when the property was donated to the National trust that no activities are allowed on the water, meaning fishing, swimming and boating are banned.

The family seem to be enjoying the high life following the sudden windfall, with Jordan and partner Katie enjoying a celebratory trip to New York in December.

Boasting that he ‘doesn’t need to work anymore’, Jordan said he was now happy to simply live off the proceeds of the estate – a reported £1,000 a week from rent and investments. 

Jordan said he had spent several years trying to prove its previous owner, Charles Rogers, was his real father, but Mr Rogers refused to give a DNA sample.

He claims he wrote several letters in his twenties with no reply, and came close to giving up.

However last year he decided to write one more letter and enclosed a DNA kit, and was shocked to receive a reply from a lawyer explaining that Mr Rogers had died.

The landowner was found dead in his car from a drug overdose on the estate in August at the age of 62 and a test was carried out that proved the pair were related.

With Charles’s mother and brother also having passed away, Jordan was left as heir to the grand estate.

Despite tests proving that Jordan was related to the wealth landowner, he still faced objections from other members of the Rogers family that he should inherit the land. 

And now he will have someone to pass the lavish property onto one day after having a baby boy called Joshua last month with Katie.  

Jordan Adlard Rogers, 31, with his partner Katie Hubber, 30, and their newborn son Joshua

Posting to Instagram, Mr Rogers shared this image of a painting of his late father that hangs in the stately home. He captioned it: 'Dad, I love you'

Posting to Instagram, Mr Rogers shared this image of a painting of his late father that hangs in the stately home. He captioned it: ‘Dad, I love you’

A video posted from inside the mansion shows a elderly relative of Jordan dancing along to a rap song along with the caption: 'Nan raving'

A video posted from inside the mansion shows a elderly relative of Jordan dancing along to a rap song along with the caption: ‘Nan raving’

Mr Rogers said he had to deal with some obstructive family members but finally got the test

Mr Rogers said he had to deal with some obstructive family members but finally got the test

Miss Hubber said on Facebook they were ‘over the moon and feeling very lucky to have such a gorgeous little boy’ and ‘can’t get over the feeling of love for him’.

Jordan, who had suspicions since the age of eight that Charles was his father, said: ‘He offered to do a DNA test when I was younger but it didn’t happen. 

‘Then when I was 18, I knocked on his door and asked if I could have the test and he told me to do it through the solicitors. I was 18, so had other priorities.’

He added: ‘I’m now starting to get my feet under the table here.

‘People say I’m lucky but I would trade anything to be able to go back and for Charles to know I was his son. Maybe then he might have taken a different path. 

‘I don’t need to work any more so want to set up a charity and help the Porthleven and Helston communities. 

‘I’ve been at the point of worrying about the next bill and have had a tough start in life but now I’m here, I want to help people.

‘I’m not going to forget where I’ve come from.’ 

Mr Rogers has moved into the Penrose Estate between Helston and Porthleven in Cornwall along with his girlfriend and one-month-old baby son

Jordan said he decided to speak out to give a fuller picture of his father's life before he died

Jordan said he decided to speak out to give a fuller picture of his father’s life before he died

It’s not the first time Jordan has found fame – five years ago, an online video of him breaking his back during a trampoline stunt went viral.

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Penrose Manor House

The Grade II listed manor has an irregular square plan and a small courtyard.   

It’s current value is unknown but the estate as a whole is estimated to be worth £50million. 

The 17th-century country house was constructed for the Penrose family – probably for John Penrose who died in 1679.

It was remodelled and extended from c. 1788 for John Rogers and c. 1832 for the Reverend John Rogers.

It was again extended 1863 by William Webb for John Jope Rogers and then remodelled in 1867.

A buttery was added in 1868 and the centre of the elevation towards Loe Pool rebuilt in 1927–28. 

He drunkenly climbed a tree before jumping 20ft on to a trampoline, bouncing off and hitting a fence.

An inquest last week heard how Charles Rogers – who was made bankrupt six years ago after not paying his taxes – had struggled with drug abuse for many years and died of an overdose in his car outside the Grade II-listed farmhouse on the estate.

The inquest, held in Truro, heard that he was malnourished and neglected personal hygiene in the months before his death. Instead of living in his lavish home, he was sleeping in his car. 

The first known owner of the estate was John de Penrose, in 1281. It remained in the Penrose family until it was bought in the 1770s by Hugh Rogers for £11,000.

Lieutenant Commander John Peverell Rogers, of the Royal Navy, donated the estate to the National Trust in 1974 – but left conditions about how it should be treated. 

Within the estate lies the Loe Pool, the largest natural freshwater lake in Cornwall, and Lt Cdr Rogers insisted there should be no activities on the water, meaning fishing, swimming and boating are banned.

He died seven years ago, leaving the estate to his son Charles.

Jordan, who broke his back in a trampoline stunt gone wrong that went viral in 2014, said he had to deal with some obstructive family members in his attempt to prove who his father was

Jordan, who broke his back in a trampoline stunt gone wrong that went viral in 2014, said he had to deal with some obstructive family members in his attempt to prove who his father was