Is this the end of office romances? Only 1 in 10 couples now get together after meeting at work2 min read

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Is this the end of office romances? Rise of online dating websites and anti-harassment policies mean only 1 in 10 couples now get together after meeting at work

  • In 2017, nearly 40 per cent of U.S. couples met through dating apps or websites
  • Rise comes at a cost to meeting through friends, which is down to 20 per cent
  • Change has been attributed to the rise of internet and anti-harassment policies 

Just one in ten couples meet at work as more and more people turn to online dating, a study has found.

In 2017, nearly 40 per cent of couples surveyed by researchers from Stanford University, California, met through dating apps or websites, making it the most popular method. 

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The rise comes at a cost to those meeting through friends – down from 33 per cent in 2009 to just 20 per cent.

Before this, meeting through friends had been the most common way to meet a partner from just after the Second World War.  

Statistics show that same-sex couples, were ‘early adopters’ of online dating, with 65 per cent of these couples meeting on websites in 2017.   

The study, entitled Disintermediating your friends, focused on How Couples Meet and Stay Together surveys taken by American heterosexuals. 

There are no comparable studies in the UK, but a British academic has said that the same thing is happening across the pond.

Lincoln University’s Steve McKay, a professor of social research, told the Times:  ‘Being accused of chatting someone up in the workplace is seen as more creepy, even if in the past it would be seen as quite normal.’

He attributed the change to concerns over how sexual approaches would be interpreted and the rise of anti-harassment policies.

Professor McKay also said those using online dating did not fear the consequences of their online behaviour, and felt less inhibited.

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He added: ‘There is reason to think online dating will lead to more stable links because you are matched to the people you have selected and who are more similar to you. 

‘Opposites may attract but they do not stay together.’ 

Lincoln University's Steve McKay, a professor of social research, said: 'Being accused of chatting someone up in the workplace is seen as more creepy, even if in the past it would be seen as quite normal.' Pictured: Michael Ross (Patrick J. Adams) and Rachel Zane (Meghan Markle) in Suits

Lincoln University’s Steve McKay, a professor of social research, said: ‘Being accused of chatting someone up in the workplace is seen as more creepy, even if in the past it would be seen as quite normal.’ Pictured: Michael Ross (Patrick J. Adams) and Rachel Zane (Meghan Markle) in Suits

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