Jeremy Corbyn hails ‘great wisdom among the poor’ in election speech3 min read

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Jeremy Corbyn says he was not ‘born to rule’ and hails ‘great wisdom among the poor’… as he gives election speech near 17th century manor house where he grew up and went to private school

Jeremy Corbyn insisted he was not ‘born to rule’ and hailed the ‘great wisdom among the poorest’ today – as he gave an election speech near the 17th Century manor house where he grew up.

The Labour leader made a big play of his determination to ‘share power’ saying he wanted to represent people who felt ‘politics isn’t working’.

In a striking passage during his appearance in Telford, Mr Corbyn said he found it ‘humbling’ to meet people with ‘wisdom’ who ‘didn’t get the education’.

‘There is often great wisdom among the poorest people,’ he added. 

Mr Corbyn noted during his speech that he grew up near Telford. He lived in Yew Tree House, a 17th Century manor house in Shropshire, and attended an independent prep school before going to a grammar. 

Mr Corbyn lived in Yew Tree House, a 17th Century manor house in Shropshire, and attended an independent prep school before going to a grammar

Mr Corbyn lived in Yew Tree House, a 17th Century manor house in Shropshire, and attended an independent prep school before going to a grammar

In his speech, the 70-year-old condemned elitist Tories like Boris Johnson, saying: ‘I will be a very different kind of prime minister.

‘Not the kind of prime minister who believes he was born to rule. Not the kind who thinks politics is a game.

‘But the kind of prime minister who only seeks power in order to share power.’

The comments came as fears were raised that Britain could be frozen out of the ‘Five Eyes’ spy alliance if Jeremy Corbyn becomes PM.

Concerns are mounting in Whitehall that the flow of intelligence sharing between the UK, US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand could dry up due to a lack of trust in the Labour leader.

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Mr Corbyn has been accused of undermining the Trident nuclear deterrent – which Labour in theory is meant to back – by admitting he would never use it. 

There are also claims that Mr Corbyn’s closest aides could be blocked from seeing top secret material in Downing Street due to links with Russia and the hard Left.

The warnings, highlighted in the The Times, emerged as Boris Johnson launches an all-out attack on Mr Corbyn, comparing him to Stalin and swiping that he hates wealth creators.

Mr Corbyn dismissed the barbs as ‘the nonsense the super-rich will come out with to avoid paying a bit more tax’.  

In his speech Mr Corbyn said: ‘My view of leadership is different from the one that people are used to, and that’s been deeply analysed by many hostile articles in newspapers, but that’s OK, they’ve got to write things, it’s their living.

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“Yes I believe leaders should have clear principles that people can trust, and the strength and commitment not to be driven off course. You have to stand for something.

Boris Johnson ()pictured at No10 today) launched an all-out attack on Mr Corbyn, comparing him to Stalin and swiping that he hates wealth creators

Boris Johnson ()pictured at No10 today) launched an all-out attack on Mr Corbyn, comparing him to Stalin and swiping that he hates wealth creators

“But leaders must also trust others to play their part. Think of it like this: a good leader doesn’t just barge through a door and let it swing back in the faces of those following behind.

“A good leader holds open the door that others may walk through in the future – because in our society everyone has a contribution to make.

“So when I talk about real change, that isn’t something that will be done to you. It’s something that can only be done with you.”

 

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