Watchdog launches online crackdown on illegal Botox adverts targeting teenagers on Facebook 2 min read

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Watchdog launches online crackdown on illegal Botox adverts that target teenagers on Instagram and Facebook

  • A committee has sent a warning to more than 130,000 firms in beauty industry 
  • It will use a monitoring technology to flag up illegal social media adverts
  • The notice will cover paid-for and non-paid-for ads posted by influencers
  • The Mail revealed how salons used media to sell Botox to 17 year olds for £59 

A crackdown on beauty clinics promoting Botox injections illegally on social media has been launched by advertising and health watchdogs.

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Salons, many employing untrained beauty technicians, use platforms such as Instagram and Facebook to target young women – with some even wooing customers by featuring celebrities such as Kim Kardashian in ads without permission.

It is illegal to advertise prescription-only medicines, such as Botox, to the public.

A warning has been issued to more than 130,000 firms in the beauty industry to prevent them promoting botox and lip fillers on Facebook. The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will use new monitoring technology to flag up the illegal social media adverts for removal

A warning has been issued to more than 130,000 firms in the beauty industry to prevent them promoting botox and lip fillers on Facebook. The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will use new monitoring technology to flag up the illegal social media adverts for removal

The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) have now issued a warning to more than 130,000 firms in the beauty industry – and will use new monitoring technology to flag up the illegal social media adverts for removal.

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The enforcement notice, which covers paid-for and non-paid-for ads and posts by so-called influencers, tells firms to review content and make immediate changes. CAP director Shahriar Coupal said: ‘This is an example of how CAP is exploring proactive ways of ensuring ads stick to the rules.’

In 2017 the Mail revealed how salons were using social media to sell Botox and lip fillers to 17-year-olds for just £59 a go.

 

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